Author: Guest Contributor

What 9/11 Taught Me about COVID-19

What 9/11 Taught Me about COVID-19

Anthrodendum welcomes guest blogger David Vine, Professor of Anthropology at American University in Washington, DC. He is the author of Island of Shame: The Secret History of the U.S. Military on Diego Garcia (Princeton University Press, 2009). His new book, The United States of War: A Global History of America’s Endless Conflicts, from Columbus to the Islamic State (University of California Press) will be released in October. What 9/11 Taught Me about COVID-19 by David Vine On the morning of September {+}

Digital Migration

Digital Migration

Anthrodendum welcomes guest blogger Patricia G. Lange, an anthropologist and associate professor of Critical Studies (undergraduate program) and Visual & Critical Studies (graduate program) at California College of the Arts in San Francisco. She is the director of Hey Watch This! Sharing the Self Through Media (2020) and the author of Thanks for Watching: An Anthropological Study of Video Sharing on YouTube (2019). Follow her on Twitter: @pglange. Digital Migration By Patricia G. Lange Migration patterns have long drawn the attention {+}

Social distancing in the times of coronavirus pandemic

Social distancing in the times of coronavirus pandemic

By Bicram Rijal We are in the middle of a coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic with its effects reaching far deep and wide. While different measures are being thought about and implemented worldwide to reduce its spread and impact, social distancing has become a new catchphrase in the global vernacular. As public, we first repeatedly heard about the messages on the importance of frequent handwashing with soap and water, and now—after realizing that handwashing alone will not be just enough—social distancing or {+}

A Call for Transformation: Framing the Situation

A Call for Transformation: Framing the Situation

By Bryan Cockrell At the end of January 2018, I quit a fellowship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. As a cis-gendered white man who was able to find other work, I want to recognize that I had enormous privilege in having the choice to leave, something not everyone is able to do despite their wishes. While in the Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas at the Met, my role was to {+}

Omens of an Intellectual Death

Omens of an Intellectual Death

Found Poems on “Scholarly Knowledge” from Promotion Review Letters by Dr. REDACTED, Professor of Anthropology, REDACTED University Dedicated to Dell Hymes, who once said, “One should react to the utterance of ‘That’s not anthropology,’ as one would to the omen of an intellectual death. For that is what it is…. Either one has something to say about [a subject] or one does not.”  #1: “Leadership in Scholarly Activities” “It is laudable that Professor REDACTED has chosen to engage with the public {+}

Anthrodendum is hiring!

Anthrodendum is hiring!

Writing, Editing, & Brand Transformation Post-Doc with Anthrodendum Field of Specialization: Anthropology Unit: Anthrodendum Category of Appointment: Transformational Track (TT) Rank/Position Title: Editing and Brand Transformation Post-Doctoral Fellow Start Date: April 1, 2019 Closing Date: January 23, 2019 About the Position: Anthrodendum is embarking on an exciting new journey, seeking to engage the discipline of Anthropology at the highest levels of imagination and achievement. In keeping with the model set by other Anthropology outlets, we seek an Editing and Brand {+}

Theses on Method: New Media, Social Technologies, and the Anthropology of Digital Worlds

Theses on Method: New Media, Social Technologies, and the Anthropology of Digital Worlds

This is a guest post by Dr. Travis Cooper, who teaches at Butler University in Indianapolis and is a research fellow with the Lived Religion in the Digital Age initiative. The study of digital worlds is an emerging field in the social sciences and humanities. The concept of studying so-called “online” cultural activities poses difficulties for anthropology and the ethnographic tradition. But how might we imagine this young and controversial field beyond its institutional context and apparent methodological limitations? Drawing {+}

We Settlers Face a Choice: Decolonization or White Supremacy

We Settlers Face a Choice: Decolonization or White Supremacy

This is a guest post by Dr. Devin Zane Shaw, who teaches at Douglas College in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. We settlers face a choice: decolonization or white supremacy. We have made excuses for too long. We already have ample evidence of the recent rise of the far right in North America. On the one hand, we have seen the normalization of white nationalism and white supremacy in political discourse; on the other, the mobilization of the alt-right and other {+}

Let’s Do This Together: A Cooperative Vision for Open Access

Let’s Do This Together: A Cooperative Vision for Open Access

by Marcel LaFlamme, Dominic Boyer, Kirsten Bell, Alberto Corsín Jiménez, Christopher Kelty, and John Willinsky Over the past two weeks, public allegations of abuse at the (formerly) open-access journal HAU have touched off what one scholar has called “a fractal socio-technical controversy exploding in all directions.” Anchored, in part, by the Twitter channel #hautalk, responses from scholars across career stages have grappled with issues from power and privilege in a time of academic precarity to the status of the anthropological canon. {+}

Cloud Security for Anthropologists

Cloud Security for Anthropologists

By Alexander Taylor Our ethnographic data is in the cloud, but our heads are not More and more anthropologists are conducting, storing and circulating their research in the cloud. Cloud storage – typically in the form of Apple iCloud, Google Drive and Microsoft OneDrive – is now the default storage option on the smartphones, netbooks, tablets and other digital devices that have become commonplace tools of fieldwork. Messages are sent to interlocutors through cloud platforms like WhatsApp. Interviews are carried {+}