Author: Kerim

P. Kerim Friedman is an associate professor in the Department of Ethnic Relations and Cultures at National Dong Hwa University in Taiwan. His research explores language revitalization efforts among indigenous Taiwanese, looking at the relationship between language ideology, indigeneity, and political economy. An ethnographic filmmaker, he co-produced the Jean Rouch award-winning documentary, ‘Please Don’t Beat Me, Sir!’ about a street theater troupe from one of India’s Denotified and Nomadic Tribes (DNTs).

Free Your Mind, the Text Will Follow (Working With Text 1)

Free Your Mind, the Text Will Follow (Working With Text 1)

While I’ve written a fair amount of software reviews and how to guides in the past, this year I thought I’d do something different. This is the first of a series of planned posts aimed at getting anthropologists to take back control of their text. I don’t mean that in an abstract way, as in learning to be a better writer, or thinking critically about textual practices. I mean taking control of the actual text files on your computer or {+}

Start an Anthropology Career in 2018

Start an Anthropology Career in 2018

Lets put aside for the moment all the usual warnings about pursuing an academic career. Lets say that you are old enough to take responsibility for your own bad decisions and have somehow gotten it in your head that, despite everything you’ve heard, you really like the idea of becoming an anthropologist. If you really will not be dissuaded . . . “Welcome to the club!” But also know that competition is stiff. You probably have better chances of landing {+}

The Politics of Explaining Taiwan

The Politics of Explaining Taiwan

Imagine if, when writing a paper on Donald Trump, you had to start your paper by saying the following:1 The United States emerged from the thirteen British colonies established along the East Coast of North America. Numerous disputes between Great Britain and the colonies following the French and Indian War led to the American Revolution, which began in 1775, and the subsequent Declaration of Independence in 1776. The United States embarked on a vigorous expansion across North America throughout the {+}

A journal of films? A journal of films!

A journal of films? A journal of films!

For the first time in the history of Visual Anthropology anthropological film can now be published on par with written articles, assessed by peers, and inscribed in international credential systems of academic publication as the Nordic Anthropological Film Association (NAFA) has launched this first edition of Journal of Anthropological Films (JAF) published by Bergen Open Access Publishing (BOAP). Amazeballs! The announcement that the Nordic Anthropological Film Association (NAFA) had launched the Journal of Anthropological Films (JAF) really blew me away. {+}

Welcome to anthro{dendum}!

Welcome to anthro{dendum}!

The holo (aka “Taiwanese” or “Southern Min”) pronunciation of the word “pineapple” sounds similar to the characters 旺來 which announce the arrival of good fortune. For this reason, stores in Taiwan will hang red paper pineapples (red also being associated with good fortune) to celebrate a grand opening or other auspicious occasion. And so, sitting here in Taiwan as we put the final touches on our new site which will go live on November 28th, I thought some red pineapples {+}