Category: Guest blogger

All post by guest bloggers should be listed here.

Omens of an Intellectual Death

Omens of an Intellectual Death

Found Poems on “Scholarly Knowledge” from Promotion Review Letters by Dr. REDACTED, Professor of Anthropology, REDACTED University Dedicated to Dell Hymes, who once said, “One should react to the utterance of ‘That’s not anthropology,’ as one would to the omen of an intellectual death. For that is what it is…. Either one has something to say about [a subject] or one does not.”  #1: “Leadership in Scholarly Activities” “It is laudable that Professor REDACTED has chosen to engage with the public {+}

Theses on Method: New Media, Social Technologies, and the Anthropology of Digital Worlds

Theses on Method: New Media, Social Technologies, and the Anthropology of Digital Worlds

This is a guest post by Dr. Travis Cooper, who teaches at Butler University in Indianapolis and is a research fellow with the Lived Religion in the Digital Age initiative. The study of digital worlds is an emerging field in the social sciences and humanities. The concept of studying so-called “online” cultural activities poses difficulties for anthropology and the ethnographic tradition. But how might we imagine this young and controversial field beyond its institutional context and apparent methodological limitations? Drawing {+}

We Settlers Face a Choice: Decolonization or White Supremacy

We Settlers Face a Choice: Decolonization or White Supremacy

This is a guest post by Dr. Devin Zane Shaw, who teaches at Douglas College in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. We settlers face a choice: decolonization or white supremacy. We have made excuses for too long. We already have ample evidence of the recent rise of the far right in North America. On the one hand, we have seen the normalization of white nationalism and white supremacy in political discourse; on the other, the mobilization of the alt-right and other {+}

Let’s Do This Together: A Cooperative Vision for Open Access

Let’s Do This Together: A Cooperative Vision for Open Access

by Marcel LaFlamme, Dominic Boyer, Kirsten Bell, Alberto Corsín Jiménez, Christopher Kelty, and John Willinsky Over the past two weeks, public allegations of abuse at the (formerly) open-access journal HAU have touched off what one scholar has called “a fractal socio-technical controversy exploding in all directions.” Anchored, in part, by the Twitter channel #hautalk, responses from scholars across career stages have grappled with issues from power and privilege in a time of academic precarity to the status of the anthropological canon. {+}

Three Lies of Digital Ethnography

Three Lies of Digital Ethnography

anthro{dendum} welcomes guest blogger Gabriele de Seta, contributing the final post in the Private Messages from the Field series edited by Crystal Abidin and Gabriele de Seta. Three Lies of Digital Ethnography by Gabriele de Seta We ethnographers cannot help but lie, but in lying, we reveal truths that escape those who are not so bold. (Fine, 1993, p. 290) Let’s start with a conclusion: Ethnographers lie. This might not be a widely shared proposition, but I experience it often in my {+}

We Have Never Been Digital Anthropologists

We Have Never Been Digital Anthropologists

anthro{dendum} welcomes guest blogger Rebekah Cupitt, contributing the third post in the Private Messages from the Field series edited by Crystal Abidin and Gabriele de Seta. We Have Never Been Digital Anthropologists by Rebekah Cupitt Ethnography: A Chimera Ethnography is the methodological chimera of Anthropology, composed of a snake (the researcher, who insinuates into other people’s lives), a lion (the fieldwork, the daunting practice through which we fall bodily into an ‘other’s’ world), and a goat (the task of writing, that has {+}

Somewhere Between Here and There: Goldilocking Between Fieldwork and Academia

Somewhere Between Here and There: Goldilocking Between Fieldwork and Academia

anthro{dendum} welcomes guest blogger Crystal Abidin, contributing the second post in the Private Messages from the Field series edited by Crystal Abidin and Gabriele de Seta. Somewhere Between Here and There: Goldilocking Between Fieldwork and Academia by Crystal Abidin One of my fondest memories from fieldwork is learning how to survive an eyelash curler. More specifically, I sat for two agonizing hours at a rather public and populated ice-cream parlour on a weekday night in Singapore, with three friends who took turns {+}

A Digital Bermuda Triangle: The Perils of Doing Ethnography on Darknet Drug Markets

A Digital Bermuda Triangle: The Perils of Doing Ethnography on Darknet Drug Markets

anthro{dendum} welcomes guest blogger Alexia Maddox, contributing the first post in the Private Messages from the Field series edited by Crystal Abidin and Gabriele de Seta. A Digital Bermuda Triangle: The Perils of Doing Ethnography on Darknet Drug Markets by Alexia Maddox Media reports sensationalize the dark web as a seedy digital location where drugs, guns, hitmen and child pornography circulate through eBay-style marketplaces that are only accessible to your hacker types. Here, elusive fringe behaviors proliferate in plain sight, {+}

Private Messages from the Field: Confessions on Digital Ethnography and Its Discomforts

Private Messages from the Field: Confessions on Digital Ethnography and Its Discomforts

anthro{dendum} welcomes guest bloggers Crystal Abidin and Gabriele de Seta who will be editing a series of blogposts titled Private Messages from the Field. To kick off the series, today’s post features an introduction and backstory to this collection of essays. Private Messages from the Field: Confessions on Digital Ethnography and Its Discomforts by Crystal Abidin & Gabriele de Seta Here’s a first confession about ethnographic work: All professional things have personal beginnings. We are today writing this introduction as editors {+}