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Coronavirus in Brazil, indigenous health, fake politics and a way out

Coronavirus in Brazil, indigenous health, fake politics and a way out

by Ana Letícia Schweig, Caio Flores-Coelho e Maria Paula Prates – Laboratório de Alteridades UFCSPA/CNPq*  Since the COVID-19 pandemic was announced by WHO, we wondered what could happen if this outbreak arrived in Brazil. Now, we already know that it has arrived and many Brazilians discredit that the new coronavirus can be a big deal. Among them, Brazilian President Salbonabo (We will not use his real name so the bots have more difficulty finding this article. As we did before), {+}

Introducing the Collective Anthro Mini Lectures Project for #COVIDcampus

Introducing the Collective Anthro Mini Lectures Project for #COVIDcampus

By Paige West and Zoë Wool During the past few months colleges and universities all over the world have shifted our teaching online because of the COVID 19 Pandemic. While many in our community have taught extraordinary online courses for decades, both because of the needs of rural and remote communities and because of the increasing global neoliberalization of higher education, many of us have not. As we scramble to put courses online for the first time ever in extremely {+}

COVID-19 Potpourri

COVID-19 Potpourri

The WHO declared that COVID-19 is now officially a “pandemic.” It should be: "COVID-19 declared a pandemic by WHOM." — John Gemberling (@Gemberlicking) March 11, 2020 While this news came as a shock to some, many feel that the WHO should have made the announcement weeks ago. Things are moving fast and it can feel hard to keep up. While it can feel like everyone with an internet connection is suddenly an expert in public health, the truth is that {+}

(an answer)

(an answer)

It’s dangerous to write and post when you have the flu. But I have been housebound since Friday and although my physical body is nowhere near ready to strike out into the world, my brain is ready to do more than just watch Parks and Recreation on repeat. So here we are. In May 2018 I asked “should I stay or should I go?” with respect to the discipline of anthropology. By that point I had been working in the {+}

Anthropology gets a little more open (access)

Anthropology gets a little more open (access)

There’s news in the world of open access anthropology. The gates have opened, just a bit more. Maybe now, finally, is the time for a bigger shift toward more anthropologists supporting and advocating for open access scholarship. While we do have some excellent OA options in anthropology (such as Cultural Anthropology), we could use more. Well, good things are happening. A couple days ago, Berghahn Anthropology announced a new open access initiative: We are VERY excited to announce that the {+}

some tips for academic job interviews

some tips for academic job interviews

The academic job market is fraught. We know this. I can only speak explicitly to the Canadian context, but we know from our own experiences, and from empirical data, that making the leap from doctorate to tenure-track is no easy feat. I do not want to downplay the realities of the struggle for folks on the job market. However, I also want to reach out here for those doctoral students on the market who might not have someone to give {+}

Inventing the Way of Tea in Taiwan

Inventing the Way of Tea in Taiwan

One never knows how to read the NY Times when it comes to their reporting on the lifestyles of the one-percenters, but not far into a recent cringe-worthy NY Times article about a tea ceremony being held in California I began to suspect that the author was not on the same side as her subjects. Ms. Elspeth is one of Los Angeles’s early tea ceremony adopters in certain and predominantly white wellness circles. She was introduced to it after what {+}

El Cruce de la Muerte: Fieldwork and Carework at the Crossroad of Death

El Cruce de la Muerte: Fieldwork and Carework at the Crossroad of Death

Anthrodendum welcomes guest blogger Amarilys Estrella, Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University. Her research examines the role of human rights discourse in transnational activism against anti-Black racism. El Cruce de la Muerte: Fieldwork and Carework at the Crossroad of Death by Amarilys Estrella In July of 2017, one year after having moved with my family to the Dominican Republic for my dissertation research, I survived a car accident. Our car crashed {+}

Writing, Silence, and Sensemaking After Fieldwork Trauma

Writing, Silence, and Sensemaking After Fieldwork Trauma

Anthrodendum welcomes guest blogger Kimberly J. Lewis, Associate Director of the Office of Scholars and Fellowships at the University of Richmond. She earned her PhD in Anthropology from Brown University in 2019 and her research interests include higher education, academic labor, and inclusive pedagogy. She is on Twitter @kimjunelewis. Writing, Silence, and Sensemaking After Fieldwork Trauma by Kimberly J. Lewis Crashing During my first summer of graduate fieldwork, I was on an overnight bus that skidded and tumbled off the {+}

Writing for Them, Writing for Us: Resilience in Practice

Writing for Them, Writing for Us: Resilience in Practice

Anthrodendum welcomes guest editors Beatriz Reyes-Foster and Rebecca J. Lester. Writing for Them, Writing for Us: Resilience in Practice In part two of our series, Humanizing Fieldwork, we considered the everyday challenges of conducting fieldwork abroad and at home. As all anthropologists know, the ethnographic fieldwork experience is not immune to the unexpected, and emergencies affecting the physical and emotional well-being of the field worker can and do occur. What do we do when fieldwork flips violently on itself, like {+}