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Payments to the Poor as Development Instrument: Review of Olivier de Sardan & Piccoli’s Cash Transfers in Context, Berghahn Books (2018).

Payments to the Poor as Development Instrument: Review of Olivier de Sardan & Piccoli’s Cash Transfers in Context, Berghahn Books (2018).

Programs that give money to poor households are implemented across the global South as part of donor financed development assistance. Originally designed as a  short term ameliorative for the social impacts of structural adjustment in Latin America, they are now components of development oriented social policy in countries as diverse as Kenya, the Philippines, Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana and Tanzania. The details of these schemes vary, as do the amounts of money which beneficiaries receive. While Latin American schemes are relatively {+}

Anthrodendum is hiring!

Anthrodendum is hiring!

Writing, Editing, & Brand Transformation Post-Doc with Anthrodendum Field of Specialization: Anthropology Unit: Anthrodendum Category of Appointment: Transformational Track (TT) Rank/Position Title: Editing and Brand Transformation Post-Doctoral Fellow Start Date: April 1, 2019 Closing Date: January 23, 2019 About the Position: Anthrodendum is embarking on an exciting new journey, seeking to engage the discipline of Anthropology at the highest levels of imagination and achievement. In keeping with the model set by other Anthropology outlets, we seek an Editing and Brand {+}

Holding, Centering, Being: The many ways we live in the world.

Holding, Centering, Being: The many ways we live in the world.

Images and notes overwhelmed my various forms of media: I was flooded with New Zealand. My heart was flooded, my being was flooded, and I knew, once again, we could not sink, but had to float. Quietly float. Unobtrusively float. Since 9/11, I could no longer float with a voice. And so I left it to those who were too young to know what it meant to have that voice stripped and to be disappeared. And I watched as it {+}

Anthropology, Interrupted: Thank you, Vine Deloria

Anthropology, Interrupted: Thank you, Vine Deloria

I was first introduced to anthropology at community college. It was…eye opening. Anthropology challenged the insufficient, limited political and historical education I’d received up through high school. It mattered, and it changed how I looked at the world around me. But there were problems. Blind spots. I learned a certain version of anthropological history and theory. My introduction to the field was what I would call “Boasian Triumphalism,” which effectively depicted anthropology as a heroic discipline that corrected the wrongs {+}

Your failure of imagination is not my problem

Your failure of imagination is not my problem

In November 2016, I flew to Zurich to deliver a talk on my work on Métis legal-ethical paradigms, prairie fish, and the Anthropocene. When we booked the tickets earlier that summer, it didn’t occur to me that I’d asked my hosts to book my travel for the night of the US Presidential election. So, as I set out from Ottawa, the Canadian capital, on the evening of November 8, I entered a strange and disorienting patch of space time that {+}

How Health Systems Hurt Women. Review of Fistula Politics by Alison Heller, Rutgers University Press (2018).

How Health Systems Hurt Women. Review of Fistula Politics by Alison Heller, Rutgers University Press (2018).

Medical anthropology has come a long way from its initial focus on the interpretive dimensions of health  and sickness. The Medical Anthropology series from Rutgers University Press provides a showcase for contemporary explorations of lives lived through the intersection of everyday practices, transnational health systems and global inequalities. Fistula Politics. Birthing Injuries and the Quest for Continence in Niger  by Alison Heller  is an ethnographic account of the experiences of women left incontinent by injuries they sustained through giving birth {+}

Role-playing urgency: bridging climate change knowledge and action?

Role-playing urgency: bridging climate change knowledge and action?

“What does it mean to know climate change?” ask Henderson and Long in a 2015 piece for this site’s Anthropologies #21. Researchers on science education, they ask this question to explore what we can do to ensure “knowledge of climate change” becomes “knowledge for social action.” This is no small task—for educators or anthropologists. It has largely shaped my own research, the preoccupations of those with whom I work and climate politics in North America writ large. As Henderson and Long duly explain, {+}

Feelings in the field: reflections on fieldwork in murk-o

Feelings in the field: reflections on fieldwork in murk-o

My lower back is sore. There’s a tension that’s rising from the place where my neck meets my scalp, and my eyes feel baggy. I’ve just woken up, am standing in my friends’ apartment. M and F have graciously agreed to host me for umpteenth time in what feels like as many months. It’s not yet 8am. F is in the shower, M is making a weak cup of coffee. M and I are discussing what the hell it is {+}

All the value that washes into the sea

All the value that washes into the sea

In August of this year, the Washington Post published an article by John Tibbets and Chris Mooney that discusses sea level rise and eroding home values. The piece opens with the case of Elizabeth Boineau, who once hoped to sell her home in coastal South Carolina for one million dollars. But because of climate change–and subsequent rising seas–the value of her home dropped so dramatically (she reduced the price eleven times), she has finally decided to just tear it down. {+}

Brazil is going to eat you up! {part 1}

Brazil is going to eat you up! {part 1}

It’s been a long time since I wanted to write something on the current political climate in Brazil. But I always faced two main problems: I’m a Brazilian, but not a Brazilianist academic and I wanted to be brief. The second issue was far more difficult, because all I could think of were too complex and all lines I wrote always tried to make me submerge in History. In true, I only intend to talk about Brazilian’s new elected far {+}