(an answer)

(an answer)

It’s dangerous to write and post when you have the flu. But I have been housebound since Friday and although my physical body is nowhere near ready to strike out into the world, my brain is ready to do more than just watch Parks and Recreation on repeat. So here we are. In May 2018 I asked “should I stay or should I go?” with respect to the discipline of anthropology. By that point I had been working in the {+}

Anthropology gets a little more open (access)

Anthropology gets a little more open (access)

There’s news in the world of open access anthropology. The gates have opened, just a bit more. Maybe now, finally, is the time for a bigger shift toward more anthropologists supporting and advocating for open access scholarship. While we do have some excellent OA options in anthropology (such as Cultural Anthropology), we could use more. Well, good things are happening. A couple days ago, Berghahn Anthropology announced a new open access initiative: We are VERY excited to announce that the {+}

some tips for academic job interviews

some tips for academic job interviews

The academic job market is fraught. We know this. I can only speak explicitly to the Canadian context, but we know from our own experiences, and from empirical data, that making the leap from doctorate to tenure-track is no easy feat. I do not want to downplay the realities of the struggle for folks on the job market. However, I also want to reach out here for those doctoral students on the market who might not have someone to give {+}

Inventing the Way of Tea in Taiwan

Inventing the Way of Tea in Taiwan

One never knows how to read the NY Times when it comes to their reporting on the lifestyles of the one-percenters, but not far into a recent cringe-worthy NY Times article about a tea ceremony being held in California I began to suspect that the author was not on the same side as her subjects. Ms. Elspeth is one of Los Angeles’s early tea ceremony adopters in certain and predominantly white wellness circles. She was introduced to it after what {+}

El Cruce de la Muerte: Fieldwork and Carework at the Crossroad of Death

El Cruce de la Muerte: Fieldwork and Carework at the Crossroad of Death

Anthrodendum welcomes guest blogger Amarilys Estrella, Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University. Her research examines the role of human rights discourse in transnational activism against anti-Black racism. El Cruce de la Muerte: Fieldwork and Carework at the Crossroad of Death by Amarilys Estrella In July of 2017, one year after having moved with my family to the Dominican Republic for my dissertation research, I survived a car accident. Our car crashed {+}

Writing, Silence, and Sensemaking After Fieldwork Trauma

Writing, Silence, and Sensemaking After Fieldwork Trauma

Anthrodendum welcomes guest blogger Kimberly J. Lewis, Associate Director of the Office of Scholars and Fellowships at the University of Richmond. She earned her PhD in Anthropology from Brown University in 2019 and her research interests include higher education, academic labor, and inclusive pedagogy. She is on Twitter @kimjunelewis. Writing, Silence, and Sensemaking After Fieldwork Trauma by Kimberly J. Lewis Crashing During my first summer of graduate fieldwork, I was on an overnight bus that skidded and tumbled off the {+}

Writing for Them, Writing for Us: Resilience in Practice

Writing for Them, Writing for Us: Resilience in Practice

Anthrodendum welcomes guest editors Beatriz Reyes-Foster and Rebecca J. Lester. Writing for Them, Writing for Us: Resilience in Practice In part two of our series, Humanizing Fieldwork, we considered the everyday challenges of conducting fieldwork abroad and at home. As all anthropologists know, the ethnographic fieldwork experience is not immune to the unexpected, and emergencies affecting the physical and emotional well-being of the field worker can and do occur. What do we do when fieldwork flips violently on itself, like {+}

Atmospheric Commons

Atmospheric Commons

ATMOSPHERIC COMMONS This text was jointly composed by the AIR group: Hanna Husberg, Agata Marzecova, Liu Xin, Taru Elfving, Nerea Calvillo, Adam Fish & Nicolas Maigret as part of the Field_Notes BioArt Society Residency, Lapland, September 2019. It features a set of cards we conceived and that were designed by disnovation.org Air is inherently multiple. Mingling and mixing, air carries particulate matter, allergens, pollution, viruses, messages and signals. Connecting bodies, places and things at interscalar levels, air couples humans and {+}

In Hot Water: Public Bathing in Native America, Iceland, Finland, and Japan

In Hot Water: Public Bathing in Native America, Iceland, Finland, and Japan

I’ve been in a lot of hot water. I have been beaten by sharp leaves and acorn-laced oak branches in Kyrgyzstan, abused by a drunk masseuse in a Cypriot hammam, enjoyed the toxic pots of geothermal effluvia in Iceland, shattered lake ice in Finland for a cold dip, and experienced the shame and freedom of semi-public nudity in Japan. Growing up in Idaho we would get a used dome tent from the charity shop, slice a circle out of its {+}

anthropology of environments: what I learned from the horseshoe crabs

anthropology of environments: what I learned from the horseshoe crabs

“Would you believe me now If I told you I got caught up in a wave? Almost gave it away Would you hear me out If I told you I was terrified for days? Thought I was gonna break” — Maggie Rogers, Light On I spent the better part of last year living and working in the US, falling asleep every night only two blocks from the mysterious lull of Long Island Sound — the weight and presence of water seeping {+}