Illustrated Man #11 – (H)afrocentric

Illustrated Man #11 – (H)afrocentric

Re-spawn. Its been on since dawn. Illustrated Man check your king with a pawn. Don’t know where but I send ’em Make my posts now on Anthrodendum Hey, ya’ll its been a minute but now I’m back with another installment of Illustrated Man, my semi-irregular series where I discuss comic books and illustration from an anthropologist’s point of view. I had ten posts at our old place Savage Minds, now here’s my first in our new home. We’re starting things {+}

This Anthropology Day, Let’s Remember George Hunt

This Anthropology Day, Let’s Remember George Hunt

It’s Anthropology Day, our discipline’s latest invented tradition! A time for reflection on chocolate mint and the values of our discipline, Anthropology Day 2018 is uniquely placed this year. Earlier this week, Cultural Anthropology ran a powerful and important reflection by David Platzer and Anne Allison on the tenuous situation anthropology is in as tenure track jobs continue to disappear. And, even more importantly, yesterday was the 164 birthday of George Hunt, the anthropologist and Indian who helped found modern American anthropology {+}

AGU: Welcome to the “eugenicene”

AGU: Welcome to the “eugenicene”

In this series of posts, I provide an account of my new relationship with the American Geophysical Union (the largest community of earth & space scientists) as an anthropologist who is doing inter-disciplinary research in the Lumbee Tribe after Hurricane Matthew (2016). Thank you to Matthew Thompson for inviting me to write with Anthrodendum. [“Syringes in Rocks” photo credit: [email protected] (2009); “Chumash Firefighters” photo credit: http://www.santaynezchumash.org/fire.html] The concept of the “anthropocene” seems like a way for us (the big collective {+}

Let’s all write shorter letters of recommendation

Let’s all write shorter letters of recommendation

If you are an academic who is in a secure, full-time position then , let’s be honest, no one in the precariate wants to listen to you complain about how hard your job is. But if you were to complain, one topic would be the endless rounds of letters of recommendation you are asked to read and write. The production and circulation of these letters has gotten out of control, people: out of control. We need to go back to letters {+}

AGU: My concern with the anthropocene

AGU: My concern with the anthropocene

In this series of posts, I provide an account of my new relationship with the American Geophysical Union (the largest community of earth & space scientists) as an anthropologist who is doing inter-disciplinary research in the Lumbee Tribe after Hurricane Matthew (2016). Thank you to Matthew Thompson for inviting me to write with Anthrodendum. In recent years, anthropology has joined many other academic disciplines in accusing humans of destroying the earth. This destruction has been summed up in one word: {+}

Three Lies of Digital Ethnography

Three Lies of Digital Ethnography

anthro{dendum} welcomes guest blogger Gabriele de Seta, contributing the final post in the Private Messages from the Field series edited by Crystal Abidin and Gabriele de Seta. Three Lies of Digital Ethnography by Gabriele de Seta We ethnographers cannot help but lie, but in lying, we reveal truths that escape those who are not so bold. (Fine, 1993, p. 290) Let’s start with a conclusion: Ethnographers lie. This might not be a widely shared proposition, but I experience it often in my {+}

Between Expert and Witness: Insider Anthropology and Public Engagement

Between Expert and Witness: Insider Anthropology and Public Engagement

By Larisa Kurtović Making anthropological expertise public—that is, releasing our insights into the world of non-academic publics—is never easy. Anthropological engagements with media are frequently awkward, fraught and unsatisfying. But what happens when an anthropologist who conducts research “at home” is summoned by the media as simultaneously an expert and a witness? On November 22, 2017, Ratko Mladić, the former Bosnian Serb military leader, was convicted of genocide and sentenced to life in prison by the International Criminal Tribunal for the {+}

Around the Web Digest: January 2018

Around the Web Digest: January 2018

Now that 2018 is about 8.3% done, it is time for an another Around the Web Digest! Is 3D Technology the Key to Preserving Indigenous Cultures? Using 3-D imaging and printing technology, indigenous cultural heritage in museums is shared with a brand new generation in the communities they are gathered from. How Facebook Stymies Social Science As social media continues to play a bigger role in our political landscape, the ethical issues of using this data in research simmer in the social {+}

We Have Never Been Digital Anthropologists

We Have Never Been Digital Anthropologists

anthro{dendum} welcomes guest blogger Rebekah Cupitt, contributing the third post in the Private Messages from the Field series edited by Crystal Abidin and Gabriele de Seta. We Have Never Been Digital Anthropologists by Rebekah Cupitt Ethnography: A Chimera Ethnography is the methodological chimera of Anthropology, composed of a snake (the researcher, who insinuates into other people’s lives), a lion (the fieldwork, the daunting practice through which we fall bodily into an ‘other’s’ world), and a goat (the task of writing, that has {+}

Somewhere Between Here and There: Goldilocking Between Fieldwork and Academia

Somewhere Between Here and There: Goldilocking Between Fieldwork and Academia

anthro{dendum} welcomes guest blogger Crystal Abidin, contributing the second post in the Private Messages from the Field series edited by Crystal Abidin and Gabriele de Seta. Somewhere Between Here and There: Goldilocking Between Fieldwork and Academia by Crystal Abidin One of my fondest memories from fieldwork is learning how to survive an eyelash curler. More specifically, I sat for two agonizing hours at a rather public and populated ice-cream parlour on a weekday night in Singapore, with three friends who took turns {+}