Author: zoë

Zoë Wool is assistant professor in the department of anthropology at Rice university. Zoë works at the intersection of (medical) anthropology, critical disability studies, STS, and queer theory. Most of her ethnographic work explores the intimacies, socialities, and materialities of life making among injured US soldiers and veterans. She’s also been thinking about new feminist, queer, and cripistemological histories of neurology…among other things.

Check Your Syllabus 101: Disability Access Statements

Check Your Syllabus 101: Disability Access Statements

The start of the semester is just about upon us, which probably means you are rapidly ditching your best laid plans to lovingly craft your syllabus into a gleaming gem of radical pedagogical genius and coming to terms with the Winnicottian spirit of “good enough.” Welcome back. The good news is that there is one easy addition that can make every syllabus shine a little brighter, something every good enough syllabus needs (and every kick ass syllabus has) that, thanks {+}

What I Wish I Knew about Anthropology and Disability: Notes toward a more enabling anthropology

What I Wish I Knew about Anthropology and Disability: Notes toward a more enabling anthropology

This post was written by Michele Friedner, with Devva Kasnitz, and Zoë Wool. This year, In the wake of yet another remarkably inaccessible and access-ignorant AAA meeting–and as many of us dive back into teaching with questions of inequity and social difference whirling within and beyond the classroom–it seems there’s no time like the present to highlight the ableism that structures anthropology. Anthropologists have always been interested in categories of difference in field sites and in the classroom. However, disability {+}

The Relativity of Toxicity

The Relativity of Toxicity

I’ve been thinking a lot about toxicity lately. I live in Houston, one of the nation’s most toxic cities and the terminal point of the Houston shipping channel, which  (depending on how you count) is home to the largest concentration of petrochemicals in the world. I know this because I live here, which is also why I know a little bit about the virtual absence of zoning laws that invites heavy industry into the city, the questionable quality of the {+}