Author: zoetodd

Zoe Todd (Métis/otipemisiw) is from amiskwaciwâskahikan (Edmonton), Alberta, Canada. She writes about fish, art, Métis legal traditions, the Anthropocene, extinction, and decolonization in urban and prairie contexts. She also studies human-animal relations, colonialism and environmental change in north/western Canada. She holds a BSc (Biological Sciences) and MSc (Rural Sociology) from the University of Alberta and a PhD (Social Anthropology) from Aberdeen University. She is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. She was a 2011 Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation Scholar.

gratitude and magic

gratitude and magic

The job of a blogger is to keep blogging. And in the last few months, I’ve really struggled with coming up with anything meaningful or helpful to say. I feel pretty firmly, as many are articulating very powerfully (please see this podcast hosted by Autumn Brown and adrienne marie brown, “How To Survive the End of the World“, passed along to me by my friend and colleague Aadita Chaudhury this weekend*), that we’re facing the end of one order of {+}

The Decolonial Turn 2.0: the reckoning

The Decolonial Turn 2.0: the reckoning

By now, many readers are familiar with the issues surrounding recent events at HAU: journal of ethnographic theory, including the letters released by the HAU Former Staff 7 here and four current and former staff here. The week’s revelations were kicked off by an apology David Graeber here. What is clear from the ensuing conversations is that issues of harassment, abuse, exploitation, misogyny, and classism/elitism remain live and palpable in the discipline’s highest echelons, and have impacted precarious and vulnerable scholars in {+}

Should I stay or should I go?

Should I stay or should I go?

At the end of my sixth semester as an anthropology professor, I’m reflecting on what it means to inhabit this discipline (or, maybe, to occupy (re-occupy?) it). I have spent the better part of the last 8 years immersed in anthropological theory, anthropological politics, and engaging and interlocuting with the ghosts of the discipline’s past. And, to be honest, this work wears away at my cells, my fibres, my bones. I’m exhausted. I have aged. I recently joked in a {+}

anthro{dendum} is now anthro{duodenum}!

anthro{dendum} is now anthro{duodenum}!

It has only been a few months since we re-launched “Savage Minds” as anthro{dendum}, but upon further consideration we feel that the site lacks focus. It was one thing when we were the only major anthropology blog, but now we are just one of many. For this reason we feel the blog needs to narrow its scope. So, with that in mind, we are relaunching today as anthro{duodenum}! The world of the gut — the microbiome, the microvilli that line {+}

A note to the exhausted anthropology student

A note to the exhausted anthropology student

It’s the end of the term. You’ve handed in your papers, you’ve written your last exams. You’ve put the last few months behind you, and hopefully you’re able to spend time with kindred folks over the holidays — be they friends, family, or kin of any other configuration. Take this time to do the things you need to do to nurture yourself. As someone who struggled immensely in my undergraduate, I want to tell you that you can do this. {+}