Roam If You Want To

Roam If You Want To

You already know how to use Roam Research, the new note taking app taking the internet by storm. You don’t need to follow the #roamcult hashtag on Twitter, or watch the dozens of YouTube explainer videos in order to start using Roam. If you’ve used Wikipedia (with its web of interlinked definitions), an outliner (with information organized by indented bullet points), Twitter (where you can find subjects by #hashtags), or any desktop computer (where items can exist in multiple locations {+}

Quaran-Teens 2020: How Communication Has Changed through Quarantine

Quaran-Teens 2020: How Communication Has Changed through Quarantine

[The following students are high school seniors at “KTH School” taking International Baccalaureate Social and Cultural Anthropology. After their final IB exams were cancelled, they decided they would like to do an auto-ethnography of their life in coronavirus quarantine. They collected data for three weeks (including photographs, screenshots of social media and virtual school, interviews, and personal reflections) and written anthropological analyses focused on different terms (communication, society, belonging, materiality, classification, the body, health, and conflict).] By Alexandria Weaver, Emma {+}

Introduction: Fieldwork in a Time of Coronavirus (new series)

Introduction: Fieldwork in a Time of Coronavirus (new series)

Anthrodendum welcomes guest blogger Josh Babcock. Ph.D. Candidate in Sociocultural and Linguistic Anthropology at the University of Chicago. His research examines the public co-construction of language and race in the making of a multimodal image of Singapore. Fieldwork—a core dimension of ethnography—has, for generations of researchers, been seen as a necessary method in many kinds of qualitative investigations, and a rite of passage in its practitioners’ professionalization. Despite severe critique from both within and outside its host disciplines, fieldwork remains a {+}

Walking becomes political during the pandemic

Walking becomes political during the pandemic

Anthrodendum welcomes guest blogger Bicram Rijal, PhD. Candidate in Anthropology at the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC., Canada. His doctoral thesis focuses on the politics of sanitation and toilets, and transformation of defecation habits in Nepal. Walking becomes political during the pandemic by Bicram Rijal During these pandemic times, empty parks and playgrounds are common sightings. The crowded cities across the world look all empty. The vibrant and busy streetscapes of major metropolises have {+}

What 9/11 Taught Me about COVID-19

What 9/11 Taught Me about COVID-19

Anthrodendum welcomes guest blogger David Vine, Professor of Anthropology at American University in Washington, DC. He is the author of Island of Shame: The Secret History of the U.S. Military on Diego Garcia (Princeton University Press, 2009). His new book, The United States of War: A Global History of America’s Endless Conflicts, from Columbus to the Islamic State (University of California Press) will be released in October. What 9/11 Taught Me about COVID-19 by David Vine On the morning of September {+}

When all there are is words for experiences that are too big for words

When all there are is words for experiences that are too big for words

I had a different first post in mind when I agreed to come on board to write for anthrodendum. I think we all had many different things in mind back in January and February, and instead, we are thinking about something entirely different. I am a linguistic anthropologist. I look at language, at what it means to different people, at how to embrace its diversities, at how we make meaning with it. But in looking at all of that, we {+}

Dear dendrites: Quarantine ethnography

Dear dendrites: Quarantine ethnography

Here at Anthro{dendum}, we receive a light stream of correspondence by way of our contact form. Usually they are pitches for guest posts or questions following up on one of our older pieces. But recently we were humbled by a new development, when a student reader turned to us as a place for advice. Here is our attempt at an anthropology advice column, append your own advice in the comments section below. Would anyone care to pose a question to {+}

Digital Migration

Digital Migration

Anthrodendum welcomes guest blogger Patricia G. Lange, an anthropologist and associate professor of Critical Studies (undergraduate program) and Visual & Critical Studies (graduate program) at California College of the Arts in San Francisco. She is the director of Hey Watch This! Sharing the Self Through Media (2020) and the author of Thanks for Watching: An Anthropological Study of Video Sharing on YouTube (2019). Follow her on Twitter: @pglange. Digital Migration By Patricia G. Lange Migration patterns have long drawn the attention {+}

Social distancing in the times of coronavirus pandemic

Social distancing in the times of coronavirus pandemic

By Bicram Rijal We are in the middle of a coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic with its effects reaching far deep and wide. While different measures are being thought about and implemented worldwide to reduce its spread and impact, social distancing has become a new catchphrase in the global vernacular. As public, we first repeatedly heard about the messages on the importance of frequent handwashing with soap and water, and now—after realizing that handwashing alone will not be just enough—social distancing or {+}

Coronavirus in Brazil, indigenous health, fake politics and a way out

Coronavirus in Brazil, indigenous health, fake politics and a way out

by Ana Letícia Schweig, Caio Flores-Coelho e Maria Paula Prates – Laboratório de Alteridades UFCSPA/CNPq*  Since the COVID-19 pandemic was announced by WHO, we wondered what could happen if this outbreak arrived in Brazil. Now, we already know that it has arrived and many Brazilians discredit that the new coronavirus can be a big deal. Among them, Brazilian President Salbonabo (We will not use his real name so the bots have more difficulty finding this article. As we did before), {+}