Open Secrets: On Power and Publication (#hautalk)

Open Secrets: On Power and Publication (#hautalk)

This is a Guest Post about the #hautalk by Emily Yates-Doerr Hau’s Editorial Board has just released its second response, this time unsigned, to the grievances aired by former staff. I am concerned that Giovanni da Col’s name remains listed at the top of the board and I am compelled to share my experiences with Hau publically. Last year, just before an article of mine was to be published in Hau, Da Col contacted me about funds for the publication. I {+}

The Decolonial Turn 2.0: the reckoning

The Decolonial Turn 2.0: the reckoning

By now, many readers are familiar with the issues surrounding recent events at HAU: journal of ethnographic theory, including the letters released by the HAU Former Staff 7 here and four current and former staff here. The week’s revelations were kicked off by an apology David Graeber here. What is clear from the ensuing conversations is that issues of harassment, abuse, exploitation, misogyny, and classism/elitism remain live and palpable in the discipline’s highest echelons, and have impacted precarious and vulnerable scholars in {+}

Drones and Witnessing the Anthropocene

Drones and Witnessing the Anthropocene

Drones sense from afar and see from a distance. They go where people can go but won’t because of cost to life or capital. Piloting precariously above coral reefs, palm oil plantations, and primary forests is not safe with a helicopter nor cost-effective. So we use drones; risk is transferred from human bodies to technology and capital costs. In these efforts, we are able to witness-from afar, with capital but little bodily risk—earth and human entanglements. In many instances this witnessing {+}

HAU is dead, long live OA initiatives

HAU is dead, long live OA initiatives

This is going to be a brief note. But I have to clarify that these are my own opinions. Anthropological twitter exploded today after David Graeber issued an apology for his endorsement of HAU journal in its conception. There are some hard accusations that you can follow here, here and here, but the main thing is that HAU was a horrid work environment. I was involved with the project as a volunteer of the social media team, and even though {+}

Review of The Pursuit of Happiness: Black Women, Diasporic Dreams, and the Politics of Emotional Transnationalism. Bianca C. Williams. Duke University Press, 2018.

Review of The Pursuit of Happiness: Black Women, Diasporic Dreams, and the Politics of Emotional Transnationalism. Bianca C. Williams. Duke University Press, 2018.

By Erica Lorraine Williams I recently spent two weeks in Lisbon, Portugal. It was the end of an incredibly busy semester, and I had recently finished reading Bianca Williams’ breathtaking ethnography, The Pursuit of Happiness: Black Women, Diasporic Dreams, and the Politics of Emotional Transnationalism. I was reminded of how international travel offers an opportunity to fully immerse oneself in another environment. Despite being in Lisbon for work, I felt free and unencumbered. I was able to enjoy a temporary {+}

Hooligans, Aggression, and the FIFA World Cup: How Football Reflects upon Race/Class/Gender/Power

Hooligans, Aggression, and the FIFA World Cup: How Football Reflects upon Race/Class/Gender/Power

The 2018 FIFA World Cup starts on June 14, 2018. This year it is being hosted by Russia. And in case you haven’t heard: we have a Russian ‘hooligan’ problem on our hands. The organized form of this practice falls along the lines of a Fight Club (1999) situation in which young (and not so young men) get together and fight. For those of us unused to the visuality of such consensual violence, it remains jarring, disconcerting and sometimes upsetting. But for those {+}

Drone Justice

Drone Justice

There is a lot of propaganda around drones being “disruptive” technologies. I have been empirically testing the disruptive potentials of drone practices through many diverse contexts throughout the world. Between 2015 to just a few days ago I’ve been conducting participatory and ethnographic fieldwork with drone operators, inventors, entrepreneurs, fanatics, artists, and activists in Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Australia, the US—including Los Angeles and Native America—and the North Atlantic—Iceland, Scotland, Denmark, and the UK trying to see how this flying Turing {+}

Anthropology as Strategy: A Review of Jay Hasbrouck’s “Ethnographic Thinking”

Anthropology as Strategy: A Review of Jay Hasbrouck’s “Ethnographic Thinking”

Anthropology is flourishing outside universities. More anthropologists than ever before work in the commercial sector- as researchers, consultants, user experience and design specialists.  Techniques informed by anthropological practice  comprise an expanding  portfolio of  approaches widely used in commercial qualitative research.  The practice of anthropology within commercial contexts has implications for the ways that research is conducted and fosters new professional identities. Many anthropologists at home in the commercial world are actively engaged in EPIC whose successful annual conferences  attract  a {+}

Anthropology Bite Club

Anthropology Bite Club

  The first rule of Bite Club is that we’re going to talk about cookbooks. The second rule of Bite Club is I need some of ya’ll to help me out talking about cookbooks. … Do you read cookbooks and think they are, in fact, practical ethnography?? When you look at a recipe do you see history and memory? Evolution and ecology? Technology? Gift exchange? Social roles? Current events? Is there a favorite cookbook that would be of interest to {+}

Open Access, Apathy & Cowardice in academic publishing: An interview w/ Taylor R. Genovese

Open Access, Apathy & Cowardice in academic publishing: An interview w/ Taylor R. Genovese

In the previous iteration of this site, I talked a lot about Open Access. The trend continues. For some background, check out this 2009 interview with Colleen Morgan, this 2011 interview with Jason Baird Jackson, this 2012 interview with Tom Boellstorff, and this 2012 interview with Keith Hart. And here’s a paper about “Publishing without Perishing” that was presented (thanks Colleen Morgan for reading it!) at the annual AAA meetings in 2012. Also check out this post about not signing {+}