Dendrites, Interns, Contributors, & Guest Contributors

Dendrites, Interns, Contributors, & Guest Contributors

Just a short announcement to point out that a couple of names have disappeared from our sidebar as we move to make our list of authors better reflect the actual nature of participation on the blog. Since we started as “Savage Minds” in 2005, the membership roles have been in constant flux and we’ve worked hard to try to maintain a loose democratic collective while still having a certain degree of structure and a clear division of labor. These changes {+}

Another Scene in the Fight Against Islamophobia

Another Scene in the Fight Against Islamophobia

By: Darren Byler In early March 2018 the influential Uyghur poet Tahir Hamut gave a series of readings in Seattle. Unlike in years past when Uyghur celebrities had come to the city, only a handful of Uyghurs—Turkic Muslims native to what has become Northwest China—came to hear Tahir speak. This was not because they did not know he was in town or because they did not care, it was because they were afraid to be seen in public with a {+}

Around the Web Digest: February 2018

Around the Web Digest: February 2018

Now that spring in the northern hemisphere is returning,  my seasonal affective disorder will probably revert to regular depression again.  However, the monthly harvest of internet discourse remains fruitful with my just as consistent monthly round-up. Well if I was not already in a state of severe anxiety regarding the job market for anthropology majors and my perpetual underemployment, this set of readings from Cultural Anthropology would have Sparta kicked me into the abyss. A little curvy Paleolithic figure meets the Facebook algorithm. {+}

Sun Ra > Black Panther

Sun Ra > Black Panther

The Black Panther movie has been out for a little bit now, and posts both pro and con have been circulating on the Internet (Kerim has a quick roundup in a microblog of his). As a white guy who studies the Pacific, I don’t really have anything to say about Black Panther, which I liked as well as any entry in Marvel’s massive movie franchise. I guess it’s not surprising that Black Panther’s hero ends up endorsing an Obama-like liberal {+}

Lazy PowerPoint (Working With Text 4)

Lazy PowerPoint (Working With Text 4)

We all know we should bike to work, but sometimes the weather is bad, or we are late, or just feeling lazy, and so we take the car. Similarly, we all know that we shouldn’t use use PowerPoint, or if we do use PowerPoint we shouldn’t stuff them full of text and bullet points but instead use illustrative pictures. But sometimes we are running late, or just feeling lazy, or maybe even have a good reason1 for using text-heavy slides, {+}

Illustrated Man #11 – (H)afrocentric

Illustrated Man #11 – (H)afrocentric

Re-spawn. Its been on since dawn. Illustrated Man check your king with a pawn. Don’t know where but I send ’em Make my posts now on Anthrodendum Hey, ya’ll its been a minute but now I’m back with another installment of Illustrated Man, my semi-irregular series where I discuss comic books and illustration from an anthropologist’s point of view. I had ten posts at our old place Savage Minds, now here’s my first in our new home. We’re starting things {+}

This Anthropology Day, Let’s Remember George Hunt

This Anthropology Day, Let’s Remember George Hunt

It’s Anthropology Day, our discipline’s latest invented tradition! A time for reflection on chocolate mint and the values of our discipline, Anthropology Day 2018 is uniquely placed this year. Earlier this week, Cultural Anthropology ran a powerful and important reflection by David Platzer and Anne Allison on the tenuous situation anthropology is in as tenure track jobs continue to disappear. And, even more importantly, yesterday was the 164 birthday of George Hunt, the First Nations anthropologist who helped found modern American anthropology {+}

AGU: Welcome to the “eugenicene”

AGU: Welcome to the “eugenicene”

In this series of posts, I provide an account of my new relationship with the American Geophysical Union (the largest community of earth & space scientists) as an anthropologist who is doing inter-disciplinary research in the Lumbee Tribe after Hurricane Matthew (2016). Thank you to Matthew Thompson for inviting me to write with Anthrodendum. [“Syringes in Rocks” photo credit: [email protected] (2009); “Chumash Firefighters” photo credit: http://www.santaynezchumash.org/fire.html] The concept of the “anthropocene” seems like a way for us (the big collective {+}

Let’s all write shorter letters of recommendation

Let’s all write shorter letters of recommendation

If you are an academic who is in a secure, full-time position then , let’s be honest, no one in the precariate wants to listen to you complain about how hard your job is. But if you were to complain, one topic would be the endless rounds of letters of recommendation you are asked to read and write. The production and circulation of these letters has gotten out of control, people: out of control. We need to go back to letters {+}

AGU: My concern with the anthropocene

AGU: My concern with the anthropocene

In this series of posts, I provide an account of my new relationship with the American Geophysical Union (the largest community of earth & space scientists) as an anthropologist who is doing inter-disciplinary research in the Lumbee Tribe after Hurricane Matthew (2016). Thank you to Matthew Thompson for inviting me to write with Anthrodendum. In recent years, anthropology has joined many other academic disciplines in accusing humans of destroying the earth. This destruction has been summed up in one word: {+}