Tag: fieldwork

The Challenges of Conducting Fieldwork in a Place You Call Home

The Challenges of Conducting Fieldwork in a Place You Call Home

Anthrodendum welcomes guest blogger Saira Mehmood. She will be a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Spelman College in the 2019-2020 academic year. You can follow her on Twitter @SairaAMehmood. The Challenges of Conducting Fieldwork in a Place You Call Home Saira A. Mehmood I conducted my dissertation fieldwork in my hometown of New Orleans. As a woman of color, I have noticed many other anthropologists of color also conducting fieldwork in places they call home. {+}

Methods of Motherhood: The Borderlands of Scholarship, Motherhood, and Trauma

Methods of Motherhood: The Borderlands of Scholarship, Motherhood, and Trauma

Anthrodendum welcomes guest blogger Melinda González. She is a PhD Candidate at Louisiana State University in the department of Geography and Anthropology, pursuing a doctorate in Anthropology. She is currently conducting dissertation research on post-Hurricane Maria community organizing in the Puerto Rican diaspora. Melinda is a first-generation college graduate, single mother, published and performance poet, and capoerista. You can learn more about her at PhDdreams.com. Methods of Motherhood: The Borderlands of Scholarship, Motherhood, and Trauma Melinda González “Una herida abierta”  In {+}

The Embodiment of Kintsugi

The Embodiment of Kintsugi

Anthrodendum welcomes guest blogger Shir Lerman Ginzburg, project director in the Department of Pediatrics and the Preventive Intervention Research Center (PIRC) at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx.  She earned both her PhD in medical anthropology (2016) and her MPH (2015) from the University of Connecticut.  Her primary research interests include mental health (particularly depression and anxiety), idioms of distress, obesity, diabetes, mindfulness, Hispanics, and Puerto Rican identity.  She also has an interest in the Zika Virus and health disparities. {+}

Humanizing Fieldwork

Humanizing Fieldwork

Anthrodendum welcomes guest editors Beatriz Reyes-Foster and Rebecca J. Lester. Humanizing Fieldwork: Trauma and Resilience in Ethnographic Fieldwork, Part II The first collection of posts in this series demanded that we recognize the fact that fieldwork can hurt, and that we have fostered a disciplinary culture where that hurt has been normalized and even celebrated. In this next installment, our contributors recognize the challenges of navigating mental illness before and during fieldwork as well as the multiple structural constraints faced {+}

“Homework”: The highs and lows of anthropology at home

“Homework”: The highs and lows of anthropology at home

Anthrodendum welcomes guest blogger Chelsey Carter (Twitter @chelsitabonita7). She is an MPH/PhD candidate in Anthropology at Washington University in St. Louis (USA) with a graduate certificate in Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies. Her forthcoming dissertation project examines how knowledge is produced about ALS and how Black people with neuromuscular diseases (like ALS) navigate healthcare spaces and experience care by healthcare institutions in St. Louis. “Homework”: The highs and lows of anthropology at home by Chelsey Carter John and Janice’s Devotion {+}

Staying with the Feeling: Trauma, Humility, and Care in Ethnographic Fieldwork

Staying with the Feeling: Trauma, Humility, and Care in Ethnographic Fieldwork

Anthrodendum welcomes guest blogger Greg Beckett. He is assistant professor of anthropology at Western University (Canada) where his work focuses on crisis, disaster, and humanitarian intervention in Haiti. He is the author of There Is No More Haiti: Between Life and Death in Port-au-Prince (University of California Press, 2019). Staying with the Feeling: Trauma, Humility, and Care in Ethnographic Fieldwork by Greg Beckett I don’t remember when it happened, but at some point, I began to respond to questions about {+}

Trauma and Resilience in Ethnographic Fieldwork

Trauma and Resilience in Ethnographic Fieldwork

Anthrodendum welcomes guest editors Beatriz Reyes-Foster and Rebecca J. Lester. Beatriz Reyes-Foster (Twitter @BeatriAnthro) is associate professor of anthropology at the University of Central Florida (USA).  Her research focuses on medical interactions, the production of health disparities, and mental health in Mexico. She currently serves as co-chair of the Anthropology of Mental Health Interest Group, an SMA Interest Group. She is the author of Psychiatric Encounters: Madness and Modernity in Yucatan, Mexico (Rutgers University Press, 2018). Rebecca Lester (Twitter @psychanthro) {+}

Role-playing urgency: bridging climate change knowledge and action?

Role-playing urgency: bridging climate change knowledge and action?

“What does it mean to know climate change?” ask Henderson and Long in a 2015 piece for this site’s Anthropologies #21. Researchers on science education, they ask this question to explore what we can do to ensure “knowledge of climate change” becomes “knowledge for social action.” This is no small task—for educators or anthropologists. It has largely shaped my own research, the preoccupations of those with whom I work and climate politics in North America writ large. As Henderson and Long duly explain, {+}

Feelings in the field: reflections on fieldwork in murk-o

Feelings in the field: reflections on fieldwork in murk-o

My lower back is sore. There’s a tension that’s rising from the place where my neck meets my scalp, and my eyes feel baggy. I’ve just woken up, am standing in my friends’ apartment. M and F have graciously agreed to host me for umpteenth time in what feels like as many months. It’s not yet 8am. F is in the shower, M is making a weak cup of coffee. M and I are discussing what the hell it is {+}

Musings from the murky middle ground of climate science and action

Musings from the murky middle ground of climate science and action

“There are many reasons why people in our field work remotely,” one data analytics coordinator tells me. We are talking on the phone one afternoon, me from the far East Coast, him from the flat Midwest, having met each other at the Global Climate Action Summit on the West Coast. He continues. For one, it’s more sustainable. Plus it’s 2018, he says, we have the technology, so why not? This allows them to draw from a diverse and well qualified {+}