Tag: photography

The cosmopolitical photographies of the Yanomami by Claudia Andujar

The cosmopolitical photographies of the Yanomami by Claudia Andujar

The purpose of this essay is to analyze Claudia Andujar’s works, built within the struggle of the Yanomami people. This analysis will be based on the “postmodern” turn, where we have a clash, enunciated by Flusser (2002), between the agency of the photographic device and the photographer’s counteraction to it, as the ideal way to establish photographic narratives with meaning. That do not just mimic reality, but stablish a “post-photographic” mimesis (FONTCUBERTA, 2010, 2014a, 2014b). The “becoming” in this analysis {+}

Repeat photography & coastal change: From notes and ideas to research method

Repeat photography & coastal change: From notes and ideas to research method

You never know when or how new research will begin. Let alone how you’re going to do it. That’s why it’s always good to take notes…and photographs. In March 2012, when I was in the middle of my doctoral work in Cabo Pulmo, I just happened to map the coastal profile of a nearby beach (known as “Los Frailes”). It’s a long, sandy stretch of beach that curves around a small bay. I walked along the edge of the waterline {+}

What the Camera Does – #RoR2018

What the Camera Does – #RoR2018

This series – #ROR2018 – has taken a backseat for several months. I’ve been mostly active on Twitter while I navigate state bureaucracies, assemble a research team, begin the process of data collection, management, and analysis, build a house, do my part to getting Footnotes off the ground, deal with #hautalk, fast for Ramadan, and focus on my visiting partner. Things have been hectic, but I found a fleeting moment to address something. Recently, I received an email from a {+}

Hurry Up and Wait, Part 2: Arrival – #RoR2018

Hurry Up and Wait, Part 2: Arrival – #RoR2018

After focusing my last couple weeks spending quality time with my loved ones, this week I have arrived in Dakar. This is my sixth time here and unquestionably my smoothest entry – the shiny new airport was easy to navigate, despite having just opened to great criticism in the middle of December. Seems like the kinks got worked out, or they were just having a good day. Passport control was fast, customs was nearly undetectable, and my host met me {+}

The Fieldnotes Ecosystem of #RoR2018

The Fieldnotes Ecosystem of #RoR2018

Early on in college, I took a lot of inspiration from John Hawks’ article calling for researchers to be transparent and engaging with their research in combination with Tricia Wang’s article outlining “open ethnography.” To me, Wang’s methodology was an answer to Hawks’ call. Somehow, I would have to navigate ethics review boards which weren’t at all familiar with using social media to disseminate information – and I did (which is a blog post for another time). Later, Samuel Collins {+}