Tag: Denmark

See You Later, Thick Data – Part 3

See You Later, Thick Data – Part 3

This blogpost is part of the methodological series “See You Later, Thick Data – How we experimented with doing collaborative fieldwork as part of an interdisciplinary research project”. In this series, we, a group of anthropologically trained junior scholars, discuss some of the opportunities and challenges we faced when collecting ethnographic data in a week-long, interdisciplinary case study of the Danish democratic festival “The People’s Meeting”. We took on a somewhat different approach to the classic anthropological fieldwork, and in {+}

See You Later, Thick Data – Part 2

See You Later, Thick Data – Part 2

This blogpost is part of the methodological series “See You Later, Thick Data – How we experimented with doing collaborative fieldwork as part of an interdisciplinary research project”. In this series, we, a group of anthropologically trained junior scholars, discuss some of the opportunities and challenges we faced when collecting ethnographic data in a week-long, interdisciplinary case study of the Danish democratic festival “The People’s Meeting”. We took on a somewhat different approach to the classic anthropological fieldwork, and in {+}

See You Later, Thick Data – Part 1

See You Later, Thick Data – Part 1

This blogpost is part of the methodological series “See You Later, Thick Data – How we experimented with doing collaborative fieldwork as part of an interdisciplinary research project”. In this series, we, a group of anthropologically trained junior scholars, discuss some of the opportunities and challenges we faced when collecting ethnographic data in a week-long, interdisciplinary case study of the Danish democratic festival “The People’s Meeting”. We took on a somewhat different approach to the classic anthropological fieldwork, and in {+}

See You Later, Thick Data – Preface

See You Later, Thick Data – Preface

Anthrodendum is pleased to welcome guest bloggers Sofie, Clara, and Emilie. They are a group of junior scholars working as part of the interdisciplinary research project called DISTRACT, studying the dynamics of issue attention at a political festival. Here the trio has been experimenting with approaches to collect ethnographic data that is integrable with other data types. Sofie Læbo Astrupgaard is a PhD fellow in Social Data Science at the University of Copenhagen, and she holds a BSc in Anthropology. {+}