Tag: methods

Staying with the Feeling: Trauma, Humility, and Care in Ethnographic Fieldwork

Staying with the Feeling: Trauma, Humility, and Care in Ethnographic Fieldwork

Anthrodendum welcomes guest blogger Greg Beckett. He is assistant professor of anthropology at Western University (Canada) where his work focuses on crisis, disaster, and humanitarian intervention in Haiti. He is the author of There Is No More Haiti: Between Life and Death in Port-au-Prince (University of California Press, 2019). Staying with the Feeling: Trauma, Humility, and Care in Ethnographic Fieldwork by Greg Beckett I don’t remember when it happened, but at some point, I began to respond to questions about {+}

Three Lies of Digital Ethnography

Three Lies of Digital Ethnography

anthro{dendum} welcomes guest blogger Gabriele de Seta, contributing the final post in the Private Messages from the Field series edited by Crystal Abidin and Gabriele de Seta. Three Lies of Digital Ethnography by Gabriele de Seta We ethnographers cannot help but lie, but in lying, we reveal truths that escape those who are not so bold. (Fine, 1993, p. 290) Let’s start with a conclusion: Ethnographers lie. This might not be a widely shared proposition, but I experience it often in my {+}

A Digital Bermuda Triangle: The Perils of Doing Ethnography on Darknet Drug Markets

A Digital Bermuda Triangle: The Perils of Doing Ethnography on Darknet Drug Markets

anthro{dendum} welcomes guest blogger Alexia Maddox, contributing the first post in the Private Messages from the Field series edited by Crystal Abidin and Gabriele de Seta. A Digital Bermuda Triangle: The Perils of Doing Ethnography on Darknet Drug Markets by Alexia Maddox Media reports sensationalize the dark web as a seedy digital location where drugs, guns, hitmen and child pornography circulate through eBay-style marketplaces that are only accessible to your hacker types. Here, elusive fringe behaviors proliferate in plain sight, {+}

How I Write Interview Instruments – #RoR2018

How I Write Interview Instruments – #RoR2018

It would be interesting to sit down and look at the interview instruments from every year that I’ve been doing research in Senegal to see how they evolve. From 2012, my junior year in college, we would find leading questions or questions that otherwise confine respondents to certain answers. Some questions just didn’t make sense. There were probably no probes. In 2013, my advisor worked closely with me to make sure that I was phrasing things more clearly and in {+}